Grand Canyon Tightrope Walk: Watch Nik Wallenda Walk 1,400 Feet Without Harness Or Safety Net! [VIDEO]

By Staff Reporter on June 24, 2013 11:09 AM EDT

Nik Wallenda
An incredible Grand Canyon tightrope walk was completed by stunt legend Nik Wallenda on Sunday. (Photo: YouTube)

An epic Grand Canyon tightrope walk was broadcasted live Sunday night on the Discovery Channel. 600 spectators at the canyon looked on as 34-year-old daredevil Nik Wallenda walked a 2-inch thick, 1,400 feet long steel cable suspended 1,500 feet above the Little Colorado River Gorge in northeastern Arizona. The stunt took Wallenda a little more than 22 minutes to complete.

In an astonishing display of focus and determination, Nik Wallenda successfully completed the incredible Grand Canyon tightrope walk with nothing but a 43-pound balancing pole and a prayer. Wallenda did not have a safety net or a harness.

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"It took every bit of me to stay focused that entire time, Wallenda said when he completed the stunt. "My arms are aching like you wouldn't believe."

Winds over the gorge were estimated at 30 mph, an unwelcome factor that further threatened Wallenda's ability to successfully complete his Grand Canyon tightrope walk.

Nik Wallenda quickly paused and crouched as winds caused the rope to sway.

"Thank you Lord. Thank you for calming that cable, God," said Wallenda 13 minutes into the tightrope walk, who wore a microphone and two cameras during the stunt.

A Navajo Nation ranger, a paramedic, and two members of the film crew were stationed at the canyon floor and watched Wallenda walk from below.

Ranger Elmer Phillips admitted feeling nervous when he saw Nik Wallenda take a pause on the rope for the first time.

"Other than that, a pretty amazing feat. I know I wouldn't even attempt something like that," said Phillips.

Nik Wallenda is the first person to ever cross the canyon. Last year, Wallenda became the only person to walk a tightrope over the Niagara falls. Finally, Wallenda is already planning his next stunt -- a tightrope walk between two New York City skyscrapers.

Nik Wallenda extends his accomplishments to his family legacy. A seventh-generation high-wire walker and a member of the "Flying Wallendas" circus family, Wallenda continues to walk in honor of his late grandfather, who was killed during a tightrope walk accident at Puerto Rico in 1978.

"This is what my family has done for 200 years, so it's part of my legacy," Nik Wallenda said. "It was a dream come true...I knelt down and I thought of my great-grandfather and that everything I do is to honor him. It took my mind off all this movement underneath me ... and I was able to focus on him and regain composure."

Watch highlights of Nik Wallenda's Grand Canyon tightrope walk in the video below!

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