Men Get Bored Shopping After Just 26 Minutes, Study Finds

By iScienceTimes Staff on July 5, 2013 8:51 PM EDT

bored man
Men get bored after 26 minutes of shopping, a new study finds. (Photo: Reuters)

Men get bored after only 26 minutes of shopping with their partner, a new study finds. 

The study, commissioned by the British rewards site Quidco.com, found that one in four men admitted to getting so bored shopping that they abandoned their partner and went home. Women had a longer tolerance for shopping, according to the study, lingering as long as two hours in stores before getting bored. 

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The top three reasons men get bored shopping are when their partner takes too long to make a decision or find what they want; when they have already bought the item they need, and have to hang around while their partner still shops; and when they're hungry or thirsty.

"If men buy whatever they were looking for in one of the first shops they went into, it's going to get pretty tiresome going from shop-to-shop with their other half--especially if they are having to follow them into the same store several times," said Andy Oldham, Managing Director of Quidco.com.

"But it seems women also have their limit when they are in a busy shopping centre, just for completely different reasons--more down to being frustrated at not being able to find what they were looking for or leaving empty-handed."

A study from 2009 suggested that the reason women may enjoy shopping more than men is evolutionary: men are hunters, women are foragers. Translate that to the shopping mall, the University of Michigan researchers said, and you see that men like to go in and get their item quickly, while women like to sort through racks of clothing more leisurely, as though foraging. 

The researchers did point out that these were general trends, and that certain men and women could obviously enjoy shopping more or less than others.  

"Women would want to have more things to search through and to be able to experience them, touch them, feel textures and see colors," lead study author Daniel Kruger said. "With a guy, he knows the properties he wants. It may be more efficient to have a counter that the guy walks up to, says what he wants, and they go get that item from a storage room."

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