366 Marathons In A Year: Annette Fredskov Burned Through 20 Pairs Of Running Shoes Completing 9,500 Miles After Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis [VIDEO]

By Philip Ross on July 18, 2013 3:25 PM EDT

366 marathons
366 marathons in a year? That sounds impossible, but Annette Jensen of Denmark proved it’s not. The 41-year-old completed over 9,500 miles in a year and burned through 20 pairs of running shoes in the process. (Photo: Facebook/Annette Fredskov Jens)

366 marathons in a year: that was the challenge Annette Fredskov set for herself after she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The 41-year-old, who lives in Denmark, completed her 366th marathon on Sunday, clocking in a grand total of over 9,500 miles. According to the Copenhagen Post, Fredskov, who started her 366 marathon challenge on July 15, 2012, burned through 20 pairs of running shoes and completed the year of marathons in an average of five hours each.

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"I DID IT," she said on Twitter after Sunday's final run.

According to CCN, Fredskov got up in the morning, fed the kids, got them to school, and then ran her marathons -- one marathon a day for 364 days in a row, then two marathons on the final day. That's like running from Los Angeles to New York, round-trip, twice.

"I'm curious about what we can do when our mind and our body work together and we don't set any limitations for ourselves," Fredskov told CNN in an interview via Skype. "I love to run, and the marathon distance is kind of magic to me."

In order to be considered a true marathon, there has to be at least three runners. The woman who ran 366 marathons told CNN people came from Finland and Sweden and all over Denmark to meet and run with her.

She also said she believes running helped alleviate her symptoms of multiple sclerosis and kept the disease at bay. "I think the running helped me with the MS," she said.

Multiple sclerosis, or MS, is a chronic, usually disabling disease that attacks the central nervous system. It works by damaging the myelin sheath, the protective insulation that surrounds human nerve cells. Symptoms include numbness in the limbs, trouble with coordination and balance, thinking and memory problems and even paralysis or loss of vision.

MS affects women more than men, and usually begins between the ages of 20 and 40. It affects about 2.5 million people worldwide, 400,000 of who live in the U.S. It is most common in Europe, the U.S. and Canada. Most cases of MS are mild, but some people will lose the ability to speak, write or walk. Scientists believe the disease is hereditary, but have yet to pinpoint the exact cause of MS.

There is no known cure for MS. Treatment is aimed at alleviating the symptoms of the disease and stopping its progression.

CNN reports on the remarkable woman who ran 366 marathons in a year:

Read more from iScience Times:

Trish Staine Gives Birth To Surprise Baby: Minnesota Marathon Runner Did Not Know She Was Pregnant [VIDEO & REPORT]

101-Year-Old Marathon Runner: Watch Amazing Video And Read About Other Incredible Old-Timers [VIDEO]

Ohio Teen Collapses After 4-Day Xbox Marathon

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