Giant Fungus China: Is 33Lb Mutant Mushroom The World’s Largest Toadstool? [VIDEO]

By Philip Ross on July 29, 2013 11:18 AM EDT

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The giant fungus in China weighs 33 pounds and measure 3 feet across. The man who discovered the monster 'shroom shows off his prize find. (Photo: YouTube/Screenshot)
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The giant fungus in China boasts over 100 mushroom caps stemming from a single trunk. (Photo: YouTube/Screenshot)

A giant fungus in China could be a record-setting toadstool. The monster mushroom, discovered in China's Jianshui County, a historic transportation crossroad in China's Yunnan province, weighs a whopping 33 pounds and measures 3 feet across. The giant fungus in China boasts over 100 individual mushroom heads that stem from a single trunk.

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The people who found the giant fungus in China are not sure yet whether the mushroom is safe for human consumption. But one thing's for sure: Had the mutant 'shroom been on Mario's dinner menu, the Italian plumber could have destroyed Bowser's Castle in a single fist bump.  

In a video uploaded to YouTube, the man who discovered the giant fungus in China is seen showing off his prize find, as wowed onlookers snap photos with the freaky-looking fungus. "I guess this mushroom can be entered into the Guinness World Records," one woman who was taking photos of the mushroom said.

According to Science World Report, China is the world's largest producer of edible mushrooms. Thousands of tons of mushrooms are harvested in the world's most populous country every year, and Yunnan province, where the giant fungus in China was discovered, accounts for 50 percent of the country's mushroom exports. The Diplomat reports that mushroom hunters even refer to Yunnan, which is home to more than 600 species of edible toadstools, as the "Kingdom of Mushrooms." From The Diplomat:

These range from Morels, which sprout during the rainy months - April to May and August to September - to the expensive Tricholoma matsutake mushroom (aka the "King of Mushrooms"), highly prized in Japan as a delicacy. Depending on quality, matsutake mushrooms sell for $27-560 per kilogram in Japan. Matsutake exports from Yunnan to Japan spiked from 20 tons in 1985 to 1420 tons in 2005 for annual sales of $44 million.

At this point, it's unclear whether or not the giant fungus in China is a record breaker, but, given its size and its odd character, it's likely the toadstool will receive some kind of official accolade.

The giant fungus in China isn't the first monster fungus to make headlines. In 2010, a young boy in West Yorkshire, UK, stumbled upon a 66.5 inch giant puffball. According to the World Record Academy, the discovery set the record for the world's largest puffball mushroom ever discovered.

The World Record Academy reports that the world's heaviest fungus on record is a 100-pound mushroom called the "chicken of the woods." It was also found in the UK.

In 2000, The Independent ran an article about a giant honey mushroom, dubbed the "largest living organism ever found," discovered in an ancient forest in Oregon. The Armillaria ostoyae fungus spanned an area of 2,200 acres -- or about the size of 1,665 football fields. Most of the giant mushroom was underground, but evidence of the fungus could be seen as small clumps of golden mushrooms growing from the forest floor. DNA testing proved that the clumps belonged to the same mother mushroom.

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