Coffin In A Coffin: UK Archaeologists Unearth Mysterious Double Casket At King Richard III's Grave Site [VIDEO]

By Philip Ross on July 30, 2013 11:13 AM EDT

coffin in a coffin
A coffin in a coffin was unearthed at the site of King Richard III’s grave in Leicester, England. Archaeologists do not yet know who is buried in the coffin, but further investigation will most likely prove that it is someone of high status. Picutred, a stone referring to King Richard III at Leicester Cathedral in central England. (Photo: Reuters)

A coffin in a coffin was unearthed in the UK by archaeologists working at the site where, last year, the remains of King Richard III were discovered. The latest find consisted of a lead coffin within a stone coffin. Scientists from the University of Leicester uncovered the mysterious coffin in a coffin underneath a parking lot where the Grey Friars Friary church once stood in the central English city of Leicester, about 102 miles northwest of London.

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The university archaeologists do not yet know who is in the coffin in a coffin, and have to first work on a safe way to open the casket without damaging what's inside. But, scientists believe they have an idea of who could be in there. AP reports that the casket probably contains someone of "high status," possibly one of the friary's founders, a medieval monk, or the remains of Sir Willain Moton, a 14th-century knight.

A hole at the base of the coffin in a coffin exposes the feet of the mystery person inside.

This is the second archaeological dig to take place at the Grey Friars Friary site in Leicester.

"It was as exciting as finding Richard III," Matthew Morris, one of the University of Leicester archaeologists who discovered the coffin in a coffin, said in a statement. "We still don't know who is inside -- so there is still a question mark over it."

According to an announcement about the coffin in a coffin on the University of Leicester website, it took eight people to remove the stone lid from the first coffin, which measures almost 7 feet long and about a foot wide at the head and feet.

"This is the first fully intact stone coffin to be discovered in Leicester in controlled excavations," the message states.

In February, archaeologists from the University of Leicester announced they found the remains of King Richard III buried underneath a parking lot in Leicester. IScience Times reported that DNA testing proved the remains belongs to the last English king to die in battle. A fissure in the king's skull exhumed from the site shows that he died of blunt force trauma to the head.

Here's a video from the University of Leicester describing the exciting find of King Richard III's remains:

Read more from iScience Times:

Richard III's Kingly Corpse Unearthed Under Parking Lot; Where Will He Be Reburied?

Medieval Knight Found: How Did Scottish Archaeologists Find Skeleton Underneath Parking Lot?

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