New Broccoli 'Beneforte' Is Anti-Aging Superfood, Prevents Heart Disease, Diabetes, Obesity [REPORT]

By Philip Ross on August 1, 2013 3:06 PM EDT

broccoli
Broccoli’s anti-aging properties are more potent than ever after scientists created Beneforte, a hybrid veggie (not pictured) made by combining conventional broccoli with a wild Italian variety. (Photo: DeviantArt/muffet1)

Broccoli's anti-aging properties are more potent now than ever thanks to British scientists, who created a superfood broccoli called Beneforte. The hybrid vegetable contains elevated amounts of a compound known to promote cell regeneration and protect against age-related diseases like cancer and diabetes.

Scientists in the UK created the new broccoli Beneforte by breeding a conventional broccoli with a wild Italian variety with naturally high levels of glucoraphanin, a compound that shows both antibiotic and anti-cancer properties when consumed.

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Huffington Post notes that as glucoraphanin metabolizes in the body, it's like giving the tiny mitochondria in our body's cells, which lose their efficiency as we age, a "new lease on life."

According to Sky News, to study the effects of the new broccoli on the human body, the team of researchers from the Institute of Food Research recruited 48 volunteers and split them into three groups. One group ate 400 grams a week of Beneforte, another at 400 grams of regular broccoli, and the third ate the same amount of peas.

While cruciferous vegetables like Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and kale show high levels of the compound, Beneforte showed the highest concentration of glucoraphanin, and therefore those who consumed it showed the most improvement in health. The Beneforte group showed clear signs of improved metabolic functions and reduced levels of compounds in their bodies that cause inflammation. 

"Blood tests showed clear signs of improved metabolism in the high-glucoraphanin Beneforte group," Sky News reports. "In particular, two biochemical processes vital to mitochondrial function were 'rebalanced'."

The findings were published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The study concludes that eating lots of cruciferous vegetables "retunes our metabolism" and may reduce the risk of many chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer.

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