Dustin Hoffman Cancer Diagnosis: Actor ‘Surgically Cured’ Of Disease, Will Continue Treatment To Prevent Relapse [REPORT]

By Philip Ross on August 7, 2013 11:08 AM EDT

dustin hoffman cancer
Dustin Hoffman’s cancer has been “surgically cured,” his rep said earlier this week. (Photo: Reuters)

Dustin Hoffman's cancer has been "surgically cured," his rep told People magazine on Tuesday. Little is known about the 75-year-old two-time Oscar-winner's battle with the disease, as Hoffman's rep declined to reveal what kind of cancer the actor had, saying only that he was successfully treated for it.

Like Us on Facebook

"It was detected early and he has been surgically cured," Hoffman's rep told People magazine. "Dustin is feeling great and is in good health."

According to USA Today, Dustin Hoffman's cancer scare isn't necessarily over. The actor will continue to undergo treatment in order to prevent the cancer from returning.

Aside from Dustin Hoffman's cancer treatment success, the actor has quite a few other achievements to celebrate. He wrapped production in mid-July on Jon Favreau's "Chef," a movie about a cook who wants to gain back his reputation after losing a prestigious job and winds up in the food truck business. Hoffman is also promoting his latest film "Quartet," which marks his directorial debut.  

Hoffman recently caught the attention of the social media world with a viral video interview of him discussing his role in the 1982 comedy romance "Tootsie." In a conversation with the American Film Academy, Hoffman described his "epiphany" while playing Dorothy Michaels of how he'd been "brainwashed" to view women in a certain light, and that "Tootsie" was "never a comedy" for him.

When talking about the first time he saw himself in full Dorothy makeup, Hoffman fought back tears as he recalled his response:

"It was at that moment I had an epiphany, and I went home and started crying ... Talking to my wife, I said, 'I have to make this picture,' and she said, 'Why?' And I said, 'Because I think I am an interesting woman when I look at myself on screen. And I know that if I met myself at a party, I would never talk to that character because she doesn't fulfill physically the demands that we're brought up to think women have to have in order to ask them out.'"

Another star to be candid about his cancer scare recently was Michael Douglas. The "Wall Street" star suffered a bout of throat cancer in 2010, and gained national attention this year when he said he contracted the disease through oral sex.

"Without wanting to get too specific, this particular cancer is caused by HPV, which actually comes about from cunnilingus," Douglas said in an interview with The Guardian.

Other male celebrities who have undergone treatment for cancer include Michael Hall, Ewan McGregor, Eddie Falco and Robert DeNiro.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the most common cancer among men in the U.S. is prostate cancer, followed by lung cancer and colorectal cancer. The leading cause of cancer death among men is lung cancer, followed by prostate cancer and liver cancer.

In 2013 alone, there are an estimated 238,000 new cases of prostate cancer in the U.S.. About 30,000 of them are estimated to result in death. An additional 87,000 deaths are expected to occur in U.S. men as a result of lung and bronchus cancers.

The possibility of cancer, even a successfully treated one, is a real threat. One study on breast cancer survivors showed that one in five women who underwent therapy for the disease suffered a recurrence within 10 years after treatment. Doctors can never fully determine whether an individual's cancer is completely gone. From the American Cancer Society:

A recurrent cancer starts with cancer cells that the first treatment didn't fully remove or destroy. This does not mean that you got the wrong treatment. It does not mean that you did anything wrong after treatment, either. It means that a small number of cancer cells survived the treatment you had. There were probably too few to be detected on tests or scans. But over time, these cells grew into tumors or cancer of the same cells as the first one.

Read more from iScience Times:

Taller Women More Likely To Get Cancer, Study Finds

Cancer Misdiagnosis Damages: Texas Mom Awarded $250K After 7 Months Of Painful Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer She Never Had [REPORT]

Talia Castellano, 13-Year-Old YouTube Star And Honorary CoverGirl, Dies Of Cancer

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)