Scientists Use Stem Cell To Rebuild Mouse Heart; Breakthrough Could Change The Future Of Heart Disease Treatment

By Nsikan Akpan, PhD on August 13, 2013 3:20 PM EDT

"Broken Heart", at the Steampunk exhibit in the Waltham Museum of Technology
A new study reconstructs tissue from a mouse heart with human-induced pluripotent stem cells. (Photo: Flickr, Jon Collier)

Reprogrammed stem cells from humans can rebuild a beating mouse heart in less than three weeks, according to a new report in the journal Nature Communications. The results could provide clues into how to build personalized transplants for use with heart disease.

Approximately one person dies every 34 seconds in the U.S. because of heart disease, making it the leading cause of mortality in the nation. Stem cells, which can develop into any type of organ tissue in the body, have been offered as a possible way to repair damaged hearts in both adults and children.

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A study in 2010 showed that rat hearts could be rebuilt from baby rat cells, but this new research pushes the limits even further by using stem cells to reconstruct a complete heart.

Read more at MedicalDaily.com.

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