Explosive Breast Implants: Airports ‘Petrified’ That Terrorists Could Use Non-Detectable Liquid Bombs In Airline Attacks

By Philip Ross on August 16, 2013 5:17 PM EDT

breast plant
Explosive breast implants could be terrorists latest method of getting bombs on flights. The liquid explosives, set off by injecting another liquid into the breast, can’t be picked up by airport body scanners. (Photo: Reuters)

Explosive breast implants are the latest threat to airline safety.  Sources say women terrorists could be hiding liquid explosives, which body scanners can't detect, inside their breast implants.

The Mirror reports that experts fear Al-Qaeda's chief bomb-maker Ibrahim al-Asiri has developed explosives that can be hidden in implants or body cavities and won't be sensed by airport security scanners.

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"Both are very difficult to pick up with current technology and they are petrified al-Qaeda are a step ahead here," one expert, who preferred to remain anonymous, told The Mirror. "It's pretty top secret and potentially very grisly and ghastly."

Specifically, London's Heathrow Airport is on "high alert" right now over the possible threat of explosive bomb implants. According to The Telegraph, security personnel are taking extra precaution to look out for "females who may have concealed hidden explosives in their breasts."

Body scanners at airports are good for picking up objects kept outside the body, but aren't good at identifying possible threats underneath the skin. That means longer lines and longer waits at Heathrow Airport as personnel keep a closer lookout for explosive breast implants.


All it would take, experts fear, is a small explosive device implanted in someone sitting in a plane's window seat to blow a big enough hole in the aircraft's fuselage and bring down the plane.

The explosive breast implants could be set off by injecting another liquid into the implants, the Daily Mail reports.

"Implant bombs are a one-way ticket anyway so the suicide bomber won't care what the trigger might be," Paul Beaver, an independent security analyst, said.

"It would have to be simple and straightforward."

Read more from iScience Times:

US Embassies Closed: Al Qaeda Terrorist Threat Prompts Middle East, North Africa Diplomats To Flee [REPORT]

Housekeeper Finds Bomb In Teen Bedroom: Is Arizona Student Joshua Prater A Terrorist?

'Landing Gear' Of Hijacked 9/11 Aircraft Found: Piece Of Metal Reminds America Of 'Horrific Terrorist Act'

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