Volcano eruption in Japan Coats Kagoshima City With Ash: Is Sakurajima Dangerous? [VIDEOS]

By Danny Choy on August 19, 2013 11:23 AM EDT

Sakurajima volcano eruption
The Sakurajima volcano eruption sent a record high 16,400-foot ash cloud. Kagoshima city braces for continued volcanic activity. (Photo: YouTube)

A volcano eruption in Japan sent an enormous plume of ash into the sky Sunday afternoon. According to Kyodo News, the Mt. Sakurajima eruption began at 4:30 p.m. The ash cloud was recorded as high as 5,000 meters, or 16,400 feet.

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9News reports large stones were thrown into the sky and lava flow of more than half a mile was observed. Meteorologists announced that the ash plume from the Sakurajima volcano eruption in Japan on Sunday is the biggest from the Showa vent since it became active in June 2006. What's more, Kyodo also reported that the Sunday eruption is the 500th of the year.

The city of Kagoshima on Kyushu Island is merely 5 miles from the Sakurajima volcano eruption in Japan. According to the Japan Meteorological Agency, Kagoshima has been coated with dense ash following the Sakurajima volcano eruption on Sunday. In fact, train operators of Kagoshima were forced to temporarily halt service in order to remove ash and rock from the railroad tracks.

Kagoshima city residents braced themselves for the ash cloud following the Sakurajima volcano eruption in Japan by wearing face masks and raincoats and carrying umbrellas. Commuting drivers turned on their headlights and foglights to pierce through the dense ash. According to some drivers, the conditions are similar to driving through snow at night. Thankfully, there are no reported injuries.

Despite the dramatic 16,400-foot Sakurajima volcano eruption, the city of Kagoshima responded to the ash and mobilized garbage trucks and water sprinklers to remove the debris. According to the Japan Meteorological Agency, Kagoshima will be relieved that there are no signs of a larger eruption from Sakurajima. However, similar activity may continue and constant vigilance is advised.

Want to learn more? Be sure to watch the footage of the Sakurajima volcano eruption in Japan below!



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