Chobani Recall: Why Is Greek Yogurt 'Swelling Or Bloating' In Cups? [REPORT]

By Danny Choy on September 4, 2013 8:46 AM EDT

Chobani recall
Chobani recall on Friday caused its Greek yogurt products to be pulled from supermarkets (Photo: Creative Commons)

A Chobani recall has been announced on Friday after discovering "swelling or bloating" in cups. The popular Greek yogurt product has been pulled from supermarket shelves. According to the New Berlin, New York, company, the Chobani recall affects products from its Idaho facility, which represents 5 percent of its total production.

According to the Chobani recall, yogurts with code 16-012 and expiration date September 11 through October 7 must be removed. The variety of yogurt and the quantity that has been affected has not been specified in the Chobani recall statements. The company claims the Chobani recall was voluntary and not a formal recall.

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The Chobani recall was prompted when the company responded to tweets from yogurt buyers complaining about "unnervingly fizzy" yogurt cups. Another person said their cup looked like "yogurt soup." Another yogurt buyer claimed that the Chobani tasted like "wine." Another person said the strawberry Chobani they purchased tasted "really old."

Chobani looked into the complaints and discovered that a type of mold commonly found in dairy that may be to blame. That said, a Kroger supermarket salesperson Keith Dailey assured that the Chobani recall is "not a food safety issue."

However, 36-year-old Dahlyla Lang-Knight says otherwise. A mother of two in Orchards, Washington, Lang-Knight said two of her small children got sick after eating Chobani yogurt Thursday.

"I'm furious," Lang-Knight said. "I want them to take responsibility for this." Lang-Knight never bought Chobani until her husband brought home some last week. Lang-Knight's 3-year-old daughter ate through about a third of the banana flavor Chobani before she put it down, describing the yogurt as "icky."

Meanwhile, Dahlyla Lang-Knight's 14-month-old ate a vanilla yogurt. Finally, Lang-Knight tasted the lemon flavor, which she thought tasted awfully tart. While Lang-Knight did not get sick, her 3-year-old started vomiting that evening. The next morning, her 14-month-old threw up in her car seat. Her children developed diarrhea and have been sick ever since, she said.

Dahlyla Lang-Knight contacted Chobani via the company's Facebook page. After posting her complaint, Chobani requested that she send an email to the company to describe the incident. Eventually, Chobani's quality assurance manager Bill Cook contacted Lang-Knight and her family and promised to cover any medical expenses after she explained that her family did not have medical insurance.

Chobani rose to supermarket superstardom for pioneering in the rapidly growing Greek yogurt industry since 2005. Chobani prides in using only high-quality, natural ingredients. Greek yogurt fans prefer its thicker consistency and relatively higher protein content compared to sweeting yogurts that have sold for longer.

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