Tropical Storm Humberto: Path Map Of First 2013 Atlantic Hurricane [REPORT]

By Danny Choy on September 9, 2013 5:32 PM EDT

Tropical Storm Humberto
Tropical Storm Humberto is slated to be the first hurricane of 2013. (Photo: National Hurricane Center)

Tropical storm Humberto formed just south of West Africa's Cape Verde Islands . According to forecasters, Humberto is slated to be the first Atlantic hurricane for the 2013 hurricane season. Weather experts do not see any immediate threats caused by the tropical storm.

According to CS Monitor, Tropical Storm Humberto is slated to reach hurricane force by Tuesday evening, Eastern Daylight Time. According to historic data from Miami's National Hurricane Center, tropical storm Humberto is expected to become one of the latest first hurricanes ever recorded. Of recent times, the distinction falls on Hurricane Gustav of 2002, which formed at 8 a.m. on September 11.

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Tropical Storm Humberto formed southeast of the Cape Verde Islands at about 11 a.m. EDT on Monday. According to the national Hurricane Center, Tropical Storm Humberto is expected to head northwest for the next 10 days. Humberto sustains maximum wind speeds of 40 mph and up to 60 mph from its center. According to forecasters, Tropical Storm Humberto may boast winds topping 90 mph by Thursday morning, effectively making Humberto a category 1 hurricane.

Hurricanes have failed to form this season due to a hot dry air sweeping over storm formations. "There's three storms that bit the dust immediately," said AccuWeather meteorologist Dan Kottlowski. "If that dry air wasn't there, these things probably would have been hurricanes."

Tropical Storm isn't the only storm in the Atlantic, remnants of Tropical Storm Gabrielle is currently 500 miles southwest of Bermuda. According to Weather 2000 Inc. founder Michael Schlacter, there is a 20 percent chance that Gabrielle may reorganize into a system within the next five days. Schlacter believes meteorologists should keep an eye out for both Gabrielle and Tropical Storm Humberto.

"Right now we're fine, but we still have six more weeks where these storms can have an impact," Schlacter said. "We're just one week into the most active month of the season."

"There aren't a lot of hindering forces in the Atlantic right now," Schlacter continued. "The Atlantic is almost like a boiling pot of water and where those heat bubbles are going to come up, no one can say."

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