Giraffe Birth South Korea: Watch Mother Jang-Soon Deliver 18th Calf, Setting World Record For Most Calf Births

By Philip Ross on September 10, 2013 12:37 PM EDT

giraffe birth
A reticulated giraffe, like the one born Sunday in South Korea, has white-lined polygonal shapes on their brown coats. There are just 5,000 of them left in the wild. (Photo: Creative Commons)

We won't be surprised if TLC already has a pilot going for a show called "18 Giraffes and Counting." A giraffe birth in South Korea was the 18th calf born to mother Jang-Soon, making her the world record holder for most calves born in captivity.

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The Wall Street Journal reports that on Sunday, Jang-Soon, a 27-year-old reticulated giraffe, gave birth to a baby giraffe at Everland Resort in Yongin, about 25 miles south of Seoul. As seen in video footage of the giraffe birth in South Korea, the adorable baby giraffe struggles to its feet after falling to the ground from its mother's womb. Baby giraffes can stand within half an hour - and run within 10 hours - of being born, and the baby giraffe in South Korea is no exception. The little guy is up on his legs, however wobbly they may be, shortly after entering the world.

Once the birth is officially certified by the International Species Information System, which keeps a global database on zoo animals, Jang-Soon will hold the world record for most calves ever born to a giraffe in captivity.

According to the Giraffe Conservation Foundation, a charity based in the UK, there are fewer than 5,000 reticulated giraffes left in the wild. They're set apart from other giraffes by the white-lined polygonal shapes on their brown coats and live mostly in eastern Africa, in countries like Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya.

Giraffes are the tallest mammals on Earth and roam the African savanna in search of food. They can reach heights of up to 19 feet, and weigh between 1,700 and 2,800 pounds. Giraffes live on a diet of leaves and tree buds high up in the forest canopy where few other animals can reach.

Female giraffes are pregnant for about 15 months and give birth standing up. Baby giraffes enter the world by falling five feet straight to the ground.

Want to know see the incredible giraffe birth for yourself? Here's video, uploaded to YouTube, of the giraffe birth in South Korea:

Read more from iScience Times:

Cow Triplets Born In England: What Are The Odds Of Such A Rare Birth?

Sumatran Tiger Cubs: Two Cubs Born At National Zoo, A Rarity For The Critically Endangered Species

Panda Twins Born In US: Watch Mother Lun Lun Give Birth To Adorable Endangered Duo At Zoo Atlanta [VIDEO]

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