Global Cooling: Arctic Ice Cap Grows 60 Percent In A Year [NASA PHOTO]

By Danny Choy on September 11, 2013 10:45 AM EDT

Global Cooling
NASA satellite images show August 2012 [left] and August 2013 [right]. (Photo: NASA)

Are we experiencing global cooling? A cool Arctic summer allowed nearly a million more squre miles of ice to form over the same time last year. This figure represents a growth of 60 percent.

The incredible arctic ice growth after the record low of 2012 is significant. Just six years ago, a science article from the BBC reported that global warming would leave the Arctic ice-free by the summer of 2013. The indication of global cooling indicates the opposite. According to monitors, the Arctic now features an unbroken ice sheet that is larger than half of Europe. The sheet stretches from the Canadian islands all the way to Russia's northern shores. What's more, the Arctic's Northwest Passage has been blocked by ice all year. More than 20 yachts that attempted to sail the passage were left ice bound. A cruise ship was also forced to turn back around.

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Due to the latest data, scientists now believe Earth is headed for a global cooling phase that extends until the middle of the century. If the cooling phase is real, then the process will debunk all forecasts of imminent catastrophic warming. Six years ago, BBC reported that the Arctic would be ice-free by the summer of 2013. In fact, scientists in the US even claimed that the forecast was conservative. 

The BBC's 2007 article quoted scientist  Professor Wieslaw Maslowski, who presented data produced by super-computer models to support his predictions. "We use a high-resolution regional model for the Arctic Ocean and sea ice," said Maslowski. Professor Masloski believed his results were significantly more realistic than other predictions because other models "underestimate the amount of heat delivered to the sea ice." 

Professor Peter Wadhams also supported Professor Maslowski, claiming Maslowski's model was more efficient due to its ability to acount for processes that may occur to ice internally. "This is not a cycle; not just a fluctuation. In the end, it will all just melt away quite suddenly," said Wadhams.

The 60 percent ice growth and the indication of global cooling was discovered 11 months after the Mail on Sunday sparked heated political and scientific debate when an article claimed that global warming halted since 1997. The Mail claims that computer models used by climate experts were critically flawed. In March, the Mail further predicted, with "90 percent certainty," that temperatures may drop and move away from computer model forecasts.

The evidence of global cooling and the expanding Arctic ice cap is causing climate uncertainty as many long standing beliefs on global warming have been refuted. The UN's climate change body, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was scheduled to begin publishing its Fifth Assessment Report, which is an extensive three-volume report on the Earth's climate every six years. Now, the organization will hold a pre-summit in Stockholm to report later this month.

According to leaked documents, the IPCC face a decision to make more than 1,500 changes to their assessment report. First of all, the assessment report fails to explain the nature of the pause. Secondly, it is importent to understand the extent to which temperatures will rise due to increases in carbon dioxide. Finally, the IPCC must also investigate to what extent are humans and greenhouse gas emissions responsible for global warming over the past 150 years, which has caused average temperatures to raise by 0.8C.

Melting ice in the Arctics has long been a visual indication of global warming. However, scientists are now studying mounting evidence that suggest Arctic ice levels are cyclical. According to climate historians, data indicated massive ice melts during the 1920s and 1930s, followed by a refreeze that only ended in 1979, which caused the IPCC to note that the artic ice had begun to melt. US climate expert Professor Judith Curry says the behaviour of Arctic ice over the next five years is crucial, both for understanding the climate and for future policy. "Arctic sea ice is the indicator to watch," she said.

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