Mars One Mission: Meet Some Of The People Hoping For A One-Way Ticket To The Red Planet [VIDEO]

By Josh Lieberman on September 11, 2013 11:47 AM EDT

marsone
Over 200,000 people have signed up for the Mars One mission, which aims to send groups of four to the Red Planet beginning in 2022. (Photo: Facebook)

Over 200,000 people have signed up for a one-way ticket to the Red Planet through Mars One, an organization whose mission is to establish a colony on Mars by 2023. By the close of the application process at the end of August, 202,586 people from more than 140 countries had signed up to live and die on Mars. It's not clear, however, how many of the applicants are serious about it, as Mars One hasn't disclosed the number of applicants who have actually paid the application fee, which ranges from $5 to $75.

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The first round to the application process called for "general information about the applicant, a motivational letter, a resume and a one minute video in which the applicant answers some given questions and explains why he or she should be among the first humans who set foot on Mars." The other steps in the four-round process include obtaining medical certifications, meeting with the Mars One committee, and competing in feats of strength to prove one's Mars-worthiness. In the fourth and final round, the Mars One selection committee will whittle the remaining applicants down to six international groups of four people for training and eventual deployment to Mars.

After a series of supply and exploratory missions, the first team of four is scheduled to launch in the SpaceX Falcon Heavy in 2022, landing on Mars in 2023. Every two years after that, a second group of four will arrive, until 2033 when the Mars colony reaches 20 settlers.

So who are some of the many who have signed up to move to Mars?

In August, dozens of Mars One candidates gathered in Washington D.C. for the "Million Martian Meeting." Four applicants sat in on a panel and described their reasons for wanting to go to Mars. Among them were 45-year-old Leila Zucker (video below), an emergency room doctor, who said, "Since I was a little kid, all I wanted was to be a doctor and travel in space," and Aaron Hamm, 29, a hotel manager who said that going to Mars is "literally something I've wanted forever."

Those are the sort of reasons that most of the applicant pool express, one discovers after combing through the many, many video applications on the Mars One site. The most popular applicant is currently Willard Sollano Daniac, 36, an electrical inspector from the Philippines who wants to go to Mars "to seek an answer about the origin of life." Just below Daniac in popularity, Rickard Feiff, 39, of Sweden, thinks that heading to Mars is "the next big step for mankind." Clicking randomly around the applicant pool brings up a 19-year-old woman from Huntsville, Ala., identified only as Briana, who wants to be part of Mars One because "I want to be a hero. I want to make a better change for the universe. I want to see space."

The largest number of Mars One applicants hail from the United States (24 percent), India (10 percent), China (6 percent) and Brazil (5 percent). You can head over to the Mars One site to see for yourself the hundreds of people who want to be among the first people to die in outer space.

READ MORE:

Mars Curiosity Rover Photographs Solar Eclipse While Enroute To Mount Sharp

TextureCam Will Enable Rovers To Analyze Space Objects On Their Own, Speeding Up Exploration

Organic Particles Found In Sutter's Mill Meteorite Could Point To Origin Of Life On Earth

 

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