World's Ugliest Animals: Blobfish Takes Top Spot In Ugly Animal Preservation Society Vote [PHOTOS]

By Josh Lieberman on September 12, 2013 1:54 PM EDT

Flickr: Claf Hong
Flickr: Claf Hong


The Ugly Animal Preservation Society in England has announced that the world's ugliest animal is the blobfish, something that shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone who has glimpsed the unfortunate creature. Just look at that thing -- no animal is going to top that in an ugly contest.

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In an online vote, 795 people out about 3,000 voted for the blobfish, with second place going to the kakapo, the world's only flightless parrot, which really isn't so terrible looking.

"We've needed an ugly face for endangered animals for a long time and I've been amazed by the public's reaction," said Simon Watt, "president for life" of the Ugly Animal Preservation Society. "For too long the cute and fluffy animals have taken the limelight but now the blobfish will be a voice for the mingers who always get forgotten." (For the non-British, "minger" is slang for "an unattractive or unpleasant person or thing").

Though the Ugly Animal Preservation Society is a group of comedians, they're sincere about "raising the profile of some of Mother Nature's more aesthetically challenged children. The panda gets too much attention."

The blobfish lives in the deep sea off Australia. The gelatinous body of the blobfish allows it to float above the sea floor without using up the energy that swimming requires. The endangered species has a knack for getting caught in fishing trawlers.

Below are some of the other fairly ugly runner-ups from the world's ugliest animal competition.

KAKAPO

Source: Wikimedia Commons
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The flightless parrot is native to New Zealand, where it evolved in isolation. The kakapo can live as long as 95 to 120 years. The species is critically endangered.

AXOLOTL

Source: Wikimedia Commons
Source: Wikimedia Commons

This salamander also known as the Mexican walking fish lives in the lakes of Mexico around Mexico City, where it has been reduced to critically endangered status due to pollution. The axolotl has no lungs; the strange protrusions on the side of its head are gills.

PROBOSCIS MONKEY

Source: Reuters
Source: Reuters

This monkey from the jungles of Borneo uses its most distinctive feature to attract mates. Scientists believe that its huge nose acts as an echo chamber, amplifying its mating call. They are some of Asia's largest monkeys, reaching 50 pounds. Deforestation and hunting have led to endangered species status.

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