IKEA Monkey, Japanese Macaque Who Charmed The World, Won't Be Returned To Owner

By Josh Lieberman on September 13, 2013 5:05 PM EDT

ikea monkey
The IKEA monkey, a Japanese macaque who wandered around a Toronto IKEA last year, will not be returned to his owner. (Photo: Twitter)

A monkey in a shearling coat who strolled around a Toronto IKEA last year and captured the hearts of millions will not be returned to her owner, a judge has ruled. The IKEA Monkey -- or Darwin, as no one calls him -- is a Japanese macaque, which is wild is illegal to own as a pet in Canada.

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Yasmin Nakhuda, the IKEA monkey's owner, had sued Story Book Farm Primate Sanctuary in Ontario, where the monkey had been living ever since animal services seized him post-IKEA. Nakhuda signed the IKEA monkey over to the city, but later claimed she was tricked into signing the form. The judge ruled that while Nakhuda had been "upset," while signing the form, she wasn't "unduly influenced."

Nakhuda had a strong emotional attachment to the IKEA monkey, referring to herself as his mom. She would dress the Japanese macaque up in human clothing and kept him at her side at all times, even while sleeping and showering. Nakhuda even claimed that the monkey would sometimes "get into a panic attack" when she wasn't around.

In one of many IKEA monkey videos from Nakhuda's YouTube account (below), Nakhuda takes the IKEA monkey to her real estate office and asks if he wants to sign clients for her. With the judge's recent ruling, it looks as though the IKEA monkey's client-signing days are over.

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