Apple Fingerprint Hacked: How To Crack iPhone 5S Fingerprint Scanner [VIDEO]

By Danny Choy on September 23, 2013 12:17 PM EDT

iPhone 5S fingerprint
iPhone 5S fingerprint sensor is cracked. Woodglue copies can imitate real fingers. (Photo: YouTube)

The new iPhone 5S is already hacked and it only hit the shelves last Friday. A group of hackers from Berlin, Germany, that go by the name "Chaos Computer Club" demonstrated a shockingly simple method of hacking the latest iPhone 5S fingerprint scanner. The hackers shared a video on YouTube to reveal their method.

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Chaos Computer Club first created a fingerprint on a glass and then took a high-resolution picture of the print. Next, hackers scanned the image and used photo-editing software to clean up the 2400 dpi resolution image. The image of the fingerprint was inverted and then laser printed the fingerprint on a plastic sheet.

Finally, the hackers applied pink latex milk over the laser printed image of the fingerprint. When the hackers peeled off the latex after it dried, it was applied against the iPhone 5S fingerprint reader and successfully fooled the system. According to the Chaos Computer Club hackers, the prints can also be made by pouring woodglue. When the woodglue dries, hackers breathed on the flake to make it moist and pressed it onto the sensor to unlock the iPhone 5S.

Apple claimed the latest iPhone 5S fingerprint reader was more secure than any previous fingerprint security technology. However, clever hackers managed to household items to crack the system.

"In reality, Apple's sensor has just a higher resolution compared to the sensors so far," explained Starbug, a German hacker. "So we only needed to ramp up the resolution of our fake.

"As we have said now for more than years, fingerprints should not be used to secure anything. You leave them everywhere, and it is far too easy to make fake fingers out of lifted prints."

"We hope that this finally puts to rest the illusions people have about fingerprint biometrics," said Chaos Computer Club spokesperson Frank Rieger. "It is plain stupid to use something that you can´t change and that you leave everywhere every day as a security token.

"The public should no longer be fooled by the biometrics industry with false security claims. Biometrics is fundamentally a technology designed for oppression and control, not for securing everyday device access."

"It's worth remembering that fingerprints are not secrets. You literally leave them lying around everywhere you go, and they could be picked up by others," noted security expert Graham Cluely

"Relying on your fingerprints to secure a device may be okay for casual security - but you shouldn't depend upon it if you have sensitive data you wish to protect."

Learn more about the latest Apple iPhone 5S fingerprint hack in the video below:

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