Musical Score Contains ‘Secret Code’ That Could Lead To Buried Nazi Treasure

By Philip Ross on September 24, 2013 4:26 PM EDT

gold bar
A Dutch filmmaker believes he's cracked a secret code, embedded in a sheet of music, that gives the location of buried Nazi treasure. (Photo: Reuters)

Could a 20th century musical score containing a "coded treasure map" lead to a long-lost Nazi treasure chest in Germany? That's the hope of Dutch filmmaker Leon Giesen, who believes he's cracked a key embedded in the music sheet that gives the location of buried Nazi gold.

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The music sheet, titled "Marsch Impromptu," is by composer Gottfried Federlein, who died in 1952.  According to The Guardian, the sheet music contains supposed annotations made by Hitler's private secretary Martin Bormann that point to the location of buried Nazi treasure. The hidden fortune reportedly contains at least 100 gold bars, plus a huge stash of Hitler's diamonds known as the "tears of the wolf."

Giesen, who is 51, didn't develop the idea of a secret code embedded in "Marsch Impromptu." It was Dutch writer Karl Hammer Kaatee who published scans of the sheet music containing Bormann's alleged scribbles last year. But Giesen believes he's made sense of the little doodles after Kaatee made the documents public last December.

Authorities granted Giesen permission to dig for the buried Nazi gold in the name of "clarity." According to The Daily Mail, Giesen has already excavated three holes in the hills near Mittenwald, a German town located on the northern foothills of the Alps just a few miles from the Austrian border. Giesen believes one of the lyrics in "Marsch Impromptu," "Wo Matthias die Saiten Streichelt," or "where Matthew plucks strings," refers to fabled violin maker Matthias Klotz, who once lived in Mittenwald.

Giesen believes one of the song's other lyrics, "Enden der Tanz," or "end the dance," means the treasure can be found at the former site of the buffer stops, where the train tracks once ended.

But he's turned up nada so far except for some unidentifiable metals.  

During WWII, the Nazi regime routinely looted countries that it occupied for gold. According to How Stuff Works, the Nazis stole at least $400 million worth of gold from other nations and an additional $40 million from the people they imprisoned in concentration camps.

The Nazis stored much of this gold in their central bank in Germany, but towards the end of the war, began to transfer it to secret caves and hidden mine shafts. Much of it has since been recovered, but rumors, speculation and theories of hidden Nazi treasure still persist. 

Legend holds that Adolf Hitler ordered Bormann to bury a hoard of bullion somewhere in the Bavarian hills during the Third Reich's final days. According to Speigel, Bormann had the treasure buried, and then scribbled its coordinates on the sheet music. He then sent a military chaplain to take the score to someone in Munich, but the paper never arrived.

Giesen is currently crowdsourcing funds online to raise money for future digs in Mittenwald. He may even film a documentary of his treasure hunt, according to Guardian Express.

Read more from iScience Times:

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Family Finds Gold in Florida Shipwreck Worth $300k; Spanish Treasure Fleet Sank In 1715

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