Tattoo Removal: New Laser Erases Unwanted Ink In Half The Time Of Other Treatments

By Philip Ross on September 26, 2013 3:13 PM EDT

tatt
Tattoo removal technology is improving. A new laser makes removing unwanted ink a little more feasible by drastically cutting back on the number of sessions required to erase the past. Good news for new Army recruits who are no longer allowed to have visible tattoos. (Photo: Reuters)

Some people who get inked will inevitably feel like those permanent skin stamps no longer suit them. For anyone bothered by a Smurf tattoo etched on her shoulder, or her ex-fiancé's name across her forearm, know this: Tattoo removal techniques are improving. A new laser makes doing away with unwanted ink a little more feasible by drastically cutting back on the number of sessions required to expunge the past.

Existing tattoo laser removal takes anywhere from eight to 20 sessions. According to CNN, the new laser makes it possible to erase a tattoo in just five sessions. There's reportedly also less pain involved with the newer procedure.  

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"After one treatment, typically, you can see 40 percent of that tattoo is gone within six weeks," Dr. Rutledge Forney, a dermatologist who performs tattoo removals with the new laser, told CNN.

The downside? It's going to be a bit more expensive than other laser treatments - which are already expensive procedures. Most tattoo removals cost much more than the tattoo itself. One U.S. Marine Corps. Vet, who spent around $5,000 on his body of tattoos, will invest about $60,000 to have them all burned off, My Fox NY reports.    

Laser tattoo removal works by first breaking up the ink into microparticles. The body's white blood cells can then absorb and flush out the ink more easily. The new laser reportedly breaks the microparticles down into even smaller pieces, speeding up the removal process.  

People get tattoos removed for all sorts of reasons. Tastes, relationships, even people's personalities - none of these are permanent. Studies show that we tend to underestimate how much we'll change in the future. 

Read more from iScience Times:

Men Think Women With Tattoos Are More Promiscuous, Study Says

Man Tattooes Eyeballs: How Did Rodrigo Fernando Turn His Eyes Black?

Color, Size And Smoking All Affect Tattoo Removal

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