Hurricane Raymond To Whip up Mexico's Coastal Waters To Dangerous Levels

Level 3 Hurricane To Approach Mexican Coast, Acapulco

By Gabrielle Jonas on October 21, 2013 2:16 PM EDT

Hurricane Raymond
A map of Hurricane Raymond Hurricane Raymond is hovering in the Pacific just south of Mexico, waiting to wreck havoc on coastal towns with ferocious gales and deadly waves. (Photo: NOAA)

A category 3 hurricane hovering menacingly over the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico is likely whip up "life-threatening surf" to wreak havoc on portions of the south-central Mexican coast, The National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami advised in a bulletin Monday morning.

Hurricane Raymond is expected to hit the Mexican municipality of Tecpan de Galeana to the port city of Lazaro Cardenas within the next 36 to 48 hours, according to the NHC  bulletin. As of Monday morning, the small hurricane was hovering about 105 miles, or 170 kilometers southwest of the city of Zihuatanejo, Mexico. In addition, it expects that hurricane conditions are possible in effect for Acapulco.

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Though Hurricane Raymond  will most likely drop only between two and four inches of rain on the south-central Mexican coast,  it may drop as much as eight inches of rain over the Mexcian states of Guerrero and Michoacan, according to the NHC. An observing station near Acapulco has already reported total rainfall of 2.83 inches (72 milometers) in the past 24 hours ending at  5:00 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time.

Surf swells generated by Hurricane Raymond are already affecting portions of the south-central coast of Mexico and expected to worsen.

"These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions," the NHC advised.  "A storm surge is expected to produce significant coastal flooding in areas of onshore flow within the warning areas. Near the coast, the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves."

A slow and erratic motion is expected throughout Monday, and Raymond could move closer to the coast of Mexico within the hurricane warning area later today and Tuesday.

Winds will reach a persistent speed of 120 miles (195 kilometers) per hour Monday night and Tuesday, with gusts even higher, but should abate by Wednesday night and Thursday, according to the NHC.

Mexico's southern Pacific coast is an area already devastated by rains and mudslides from Tropical Storm Manuel last month, according to the Associated Press wire service.

In a region where 10,000 people were evacuated from their homes after Manuel caused flooding and risk of landslide a month ago, officials deployed emergency teams and considered further evacuations, the AP wire service reported.

The eye of Hurricane Raymond is located near 16.3 north latitude, and 102.2 west longitude. Hurricane force winds will be radiating outward for up to 15 miles (30 kilometers) from the center. Less powerful, but still destructive tropical force winds will be radiating outward from the eye for up to 70 miles, or 110 kilometers, according to the NHC.

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