WATCH: Snake Eats Crocodile In Australia; Plus See 5 Other Videos Of Snakes Consuming Large Prey

on March 4, 2014 1:48 PM EST

python
A snake, likely a python, battled a crocodile over the course of five hours in Queensland, Australia, on Sunday. The snake won. (Photo: Reuters)

A ten-foot snake believed to be a python devoured a crocodile at Lake Moondarra in Queensland, Australia, on Sunday. To the delight of the internet, the five-hour snake vs. croc battle was captured on camera, thanks to onlooker Tiffany Corlis.

Like Us on Facebook

"It was amazing," Corlis told the BBC. "We saw the snake fighting with the crocodile--it would roll the crocodile around to get a better grip, and coil its body around the crocodile's legs to hold it tight. The fight began in the water--the crocodile was trying to hold its head out of the water at one time, and the snake was constricting it. After the crocodile had died, the snake uncoiled itself, came around to the front, and started to eat the crocodile, face-first."

At about three feet long, the crocodile was not rare prey for a snake, but was somewhat risky, according to Bryan Fry, a snake expert and a professor at the University of Queensland. Pythons in the area generally stick to small animals like rats, which aren't as dangerous as crocs but aren't nearly as hearty either. (The snake won't have to eat for another two months following his victory over the crocodile.) "They can swallow a crocodile, no problem, but it can defend itself, so it's a more risky choice than a rat," said Fry, who added that another risk was that the snake made itself vulnerable to attack by another animal during the five-hour crocodile battle.

A python kills its prey by constricting the unfortunate animal's breathing. It does not squeeze the air out of its prey; rather, when the prey exhales, the python tightens its coils, restricting the prey's breathing until it dies. The process of consuming large prey requires a lot of energy, and a 2012 study suggests that snakes can detect their prey's heartbeat, leading snakes to lessen constriction--and thus conserve energy--after the prey has died. Because python's jaws aren't connected to bone, but to stretchy ligaments, they are able to consume prey 75 to 100 percent their size.

Below, find five other instances of snakes taking on massive prey.

Python Vs. Antelope

Python Vs. Alligator

Python Vs. Deer

Anaconda Vs. Cow

This one is truly horrifying.

Python Vs. Monkey

Snake Vs. Bear

Okay, this one is cheating. But it does show Bear Grylls eating a raw snake, so it's worth watching.

READ MORE:

MERS Virus In Saudi Arabian Camels Is 'Widespread,' Has Been Present For At Least 20 Years

Why It's Unsurprising That Ants Use Their Babies As Life Preservers During Floods

Deadly Honeybee Diseases Spreading To Wild Bumblebees In Large Numbers, Study Finds

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)