Tiny Black Holes May Harbor Universe's Dark Matter

By Matthew Mientka on May 3, 2014 8:10 PM EDT

Do Tiny Black Holes Dot Universe?
A pair of Russian researchers say the universe might be dotted with ubiquitous quantum-sized black holes, with properties similar to the hypothesized dark matter. Photo courtesy of Marsel Minga, CC BY 2.0.

The search for dark matter thought to compose much of the universe assumes Rumsfeldian dimensions as astrophysicists ponder not only known unknowns but the “unknown unknowns" that worried former President George W. Bush’s senior war advisor.

Like Us on Facebook

Although scientists don’t understand the nature of dark matter, they believe the mysterious hidden material must exist given the immensity of gravity binding the galaxies and other astral structures. Under the present understanding of the physical world, such a universe cannot exist without large amounts of hidden matter. The matter visible to the eye is vastly insufficient.

So for decades researchers around the globe have been searching high and low for evidence of dark matter, using instruments on the ground and in space. Now, astrophysicists Vyacheslav Dokuchaev and Yury Eroshenko at the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow say they’ve discovered the cosmic parlor trick. Dark matter may be comprised of the quantum-sized “black hole atoms” science has long postulated as a byproduct of the Big Bang. The explosion would have ripped areas of space dense enough to allow the formation of microscopic black holes, tiny mud puddles neither here nor there.

The mysterious — and apparently ubiquitous — material remains cloaked to the human eye even with advanced telescopes. As some believe intelligence to be distributed throughout the universe, these researchers suggest the university must be full of “primordial black holes.” Either that, or an explanation hinges on an unknown waiting to be discovered by future generations of humankind.

But today, Dokuchaev and Eroshenko are building on a theory proposed in the 1970s by fellow Russian physicist Moisei Markov as well as by Canadian research partner Valeri Frolov. The so-called “friedmon theory” resolved a key matter of Einstein’s theory of general relativity. This mathematical solution creates a bizarre world in which the friedmon resembles a microscopic black hole with an electric charge exactly like that of an electron — but with an interior as large as the universe itself.

The first to compare friedmons with dark matter, the Russian researchers say the “neutral black hole atoms” should carry the same properties thought to exist in black holes, themselves based upon controversial contemporary theories. Sounding like 19th century Russian novelist, Dokuchaev described the quantum black holes in a paper published in March in the journal Advances in High Energy Physics: They "would therefore be dark, massive, non-interacting particles" — with properties similar to the universe's supposed dark matter.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)