Forensics

aztec dog
Aztec Dog Burial Site Found Under Mexico City Apartments Is World's Oldest Pet Cemetery
Feb 18, 2014 18:37 PM E
A dog burial site in Mexico City may be the oldest pet cemetery ever uncovered. The dogs were buried together between 1350 and 1520 A.D. by the Aztecs, who attached religious and symbolic qualities to dogs. Rocio Morales Sanchez, an archaeologist who helped discovery the dog burial site, called it "a special finding because of the number of dogs.
real mona lisa
Who Was Mona Lisa? DNA Testing On Bones Found In Florence May ID Da Vinci's Model
Feb 18, 2014 12:32 PM E
The "real" Mona Lisa may be Lisa Gherardini, according to art sleuth Silvano Vinceti. Gherardini has long been thought to be the model for da Vinci's painting, and after her possible remains were uncovered in August 2013, DNA will now be drawn from her bones to match it against her confirmed relatives.
Chaohusaurus
Dinosaur Embryo Frozen Mid-Birth Gives Paleontologists Rare Snapshot Of Ancient Reptile Baby-Making
Feb 15, 2014 13:43 PM E
An incredible fossil shows an ancient marine reptile mid-birth, a find that could hold the answer to an evolutionary question: did land reptiles give live births?
One Swab of a Cheek Can Uncover Centuries of Racial Identity
What is Scientific Racism? ID by Genome Could Lead To "Race-Specific" Education
Feb 14, 2014 15:17 PM E
An anthropologist addressing the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science said Friday that classification of students by genetic potential is looming in the future.
fish fossil
How Did You Get Your Face? Scientists Use Fish Fossils To Explain How Jaws Evolved
Feb 12, 2014 18:00 PM E
Scientists in France and Sweden used fossilized fish to explain how humans and other vertebrates evolved from being jaw-less to jawed.
Newly Discovered Whale Species From Fossil
Walrus With Four Tusks And New Species Of Whale Among Fossils Found In California’s Half Moon Bay
Feb 08, 2014 16:00 PM E
A massive and eclectic collection of fossils discovered on the northern coast of California includes a newly-identified species of whale, a walrus with four tusks, and marine birds.
It's Now Possible To Find Out What Percent Neanderthal You Are
Are You Part Neanderthal? Genographic Project Uses 200 College Students' Cheek Swabs To Trace Ancestry Back 200,000 Years
Feb 04, 2014 10:27 AM E
Students will be able to able to find out what percent Neanderthal they are, and the migration patterns of their ancestors, even across continents.
The Qesem Cave Excavation
Discovery Of Prehistoric Hearth In Israel's Qesem Cave Suggests Human Culture May Have Begun 300,000 Years Ago
Jan 28, 2014 09:52 AM E
A team of Israeli scientists have stumbled upon evidence of the use of fire about 300,000 years ago in the Qesem Cave in the present day region of Rosh Ha'ayin.
Model of Noah's Ark
Noah's Ark Was Round, Based On 4,000-Year-Old Mesopotamian Instructions That Are 'Mathematically Accurate'
Jan 28, 2014 09:03 AM E
A 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablet from Mesopotamia instructs a mythological character how to build a round "ark" he can use to rescue his family and animals from a flood.
Light Skin, Blue Eyes
7,000-Year-Old Bones Suggest Europeans Developed Light Skin Much Later Than Previously Thought
Jan 26, 2014 17:50 PM E
Light skin in Europe probably evolved because of changes in diet due to agriculture, not because of the lack of sunlight in northern latitudes, according to new research that examines 7,000-year-old human remains.
La Brana 1
The First Recovered Genome Of A European Hunter-Gatherer Shows They Had Blue Eyes, Dark Skin
Jan 26, 2014 17:42 PM E
For the first time, researchers have recovered the genome of a European hunter-gatherer who lived nearly 7,000 years ago, and found that the individual had some contrasting traits.
alfred the great
King Alfred the Great's Remains Found Inside A Cardboard Box
Jan 18, 2014 17:02 PM E
The remains of Alfred the Great, who founded the English Kingdom, were believed to be lost since his death in 899 AD. They were found at a museum, where they had been in a storage box for nearly two decades.
Alexander the Great
Alexander The Great Could Have Died From Toxic Wine; Ancient Ruler May Have Been Poisoned By Little White Flower
Jan 11, 2014 12:36 PM E
Historians have long assumed Alexander the Great died from typhoid fever or malaria. But there might be a more sinister explanation: that he was poisoned by the toxic wine of a little white flower.
Ark of the Covenant
Ark Of The Covenant Found? Newly Translated Hebrew Text Lists King Solomon’s Treasures And Their Possible Locations
Jan 10, 2014 11:23 AM E
A newly translated ancient Hebrew text offers clues to the the location of the Ark of the Covenant, and the other treasures of Solomon, King of Ancient Israel.
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