Forensics

Neanderthal
Neanderthals Buried Their Dead In Caves, Researchers Find
Dec 17, 2013 14:50 PM E
Neanderthals buried their dead, a new study finds. Studying remains found at La Chapelle-aux-Saints cave in southwestern France, study author William Rendu found bones buried in pits that were not naturally formed. The study, "Evidence supporting an intentional Neanderthal burial at La Chapelle-aux-Saints," was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
hand bone
1.4 Million-Year-Old Hand Fossil Discovered: Bone Gave Human Ancestors Ability To Make Tools
Dec 16, 2013 15:47 PM E
Researchers have found the earliest example of a bone which is key to the way the human hand functions. The a 1.4 million-year-old bone gives humans the ability to make and use tools, and millions of years ago it gave human ancestors the same ability. The bone, the third metacarpal, was discovered in West Turkana, Kenya.
Lost Japanese Sub from World War II
Lost Japanese World War II Mega-Sub Found Off Oahu Coast; Largest Marine Vessel Ever Built At The Time
Dec 04, 2013 09:47 AM E
A recently recovered Japanese World War II mega-sub, the I-400, was sunk in 1945, and was left hidden underwater because the U.S. did not want its advanced technology to fall into the hands of the Soviets.
Riparo Bombrini excavation site.
Neanderthals Shared Modern Man’s Ability — And Desire — To Organize Their Living Spaces
Dec 03, 2013 10:16 AM E
Neanderthals weren't that much different than modern man. Like us, Neanderthals liked to keep their living spaces organized for ease of use, clarity of mind, and safety.
Facial Recognition Research Intensifies
'Soft' Biometric Cameras Are Watching: Govt. Intelligence Hopes To Use Cameras To Recognize People By The Shape Of Their Ears
Dec 02, 2013 09:23 AM E
Facial recognition techniques used for security surveillance are being expanded with increased "soft" biometrics development, according to the U.S. government's Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, which put out a call for researchers to work toward dramatic improvements in recognition technology.
hominin
Cradle Of Humankind Cave In South Africa Yields Over 1000 Fossils
Nov 27, 2013 14:31 PM E
An archaeological team led by Lee Berger have found over a thousand fossils in the Rising Star cave in South Africa's Cradle of Humankind. At least one hominin skull was found among the many fossils. The cave is located about 30 miles from Johannesburg.
Buddha
Buddha Has A New Birthday; Archaeological Dig Discovers Wooden Structure At Buddhist 'Bethlehem' Site
Nov 26, 2013 08:26 AM E
Archaeologists have unearthed the first material evidence linking Buddha to a specific century, perhaps resolving with new science millennia of uncertainty about the birthday of the spiritual leader.
Ancient Kabri Wine Jugs
World's Oldest, Largest Wine Cellar Ever Discovered In Israel; Ancient Canaanites Made Wine With Juniper, Cinnamon, Mint, And Honey
Nov 22, 2013 08:54 AM E
Archaeologists uncovered 3,700-year-old wine jars in Tel Kabri, Israel, which they suspect to be part of the world's oldest and largest wine cellar, dating back to the Canaanite civilization.
Lake Baikal
DNA Analysis Of 24,000 Year Old Body Suggests Native Americans Were Originally From Europe
Nov 21, 2013 11:06 AM E
Genomic analysis of the remains of a 3-4-year old boy buried 24,000 years ago reveals a previously unknown genetic link between Europeans and Native Americans, casting new light on human migration to the Americas.
Brittany Murphy and her husband Simon Monjack
Brittany Murphy May Have Died From Rat Poisoning: Mystery Of Death Intensifies With New Toxicology Report
Nov 19, 2013 07:10 AM E
A new, independent, toxicology report ordered by Brittany Murphy's father indicates that she and her husband may have been poisoned using rat poison or insect poison.
Fossil of Dinosaurs Battling to the Death Could Fetch Millions in Auction
Violent Tableaux of Two Fossilized 'Deuling Dinosaurs' Engaged in Death Struggle Could Fetch $8M at Auction
Nov 18, 2013 18:21 PM E
The "dueling dinosaurs" fossil, which even includes some skin, may solve some mysteries about the T-Rex.
King Tut
King Tut Died In A Chariot Race, Then Spontaneously Combusted
Nov 05, 2013 12:26 PM E
King Tut's death more than 3,300 years ago has been a mystery since British archaeologists discovered his tomb in 1922. But high-tech research tells the unusually specific narrative of the boy pharaoh's stranger-than-fiction end.
human brain
Human Brains Boiled 4,000 Years Ago Discovered In Bronze Age Skeletons
Oct 03, 2013 22:05 PM E
Scientists in Turkey found 4,000-year-old brain tissue inside four Bronze Age skeletons. The brains were boiled in their own skulls, preserving them nearly intact until their discovery in 2006 and 2010.
dino tail
Rare Dinosaur Fossil Unearthed In Canada During Pipeline Construction
Oct 03, 2013 14:50 PM E
A construction crew working on a pipeline in Alberta stumbled upon a rare dinosaur fossil. The nearly intact dinosaur tail will be carted off and prepared for study.
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