Global warming

High Fructose Corn Syrup vs Sugar
Climate Change May Create Price Volatility in the Corn Market, Say Stanford and Purdue Researchers
Apr 22, 2012 14:41 PM E
By the time today's elementary schoolers graduate from college, the U.S. corn belt could be forced to move to the Canadian border to escape devastating heat waves brought on by rising global temperatures.
Crater
Asteroid Craters on Earth Give Clues in Search for Life on Mars
Apr 17, 2012 08:45 AM E
Craters made by asteroid impacts may be the best place to look for signs of life on other planets, a study suggests.
Emmission
Resurfacing Urban Areas to Offset 150 Billion Tons of CO2
Apr 16, 2012 07:27 AM E
Imagine a world where the rooftops and pavements of every urban area are resurfaced to increase the reflection of the Sun's light rays. Well, this is exactly what a group of Canadian researchers have done in an attempt to measure the potential effects against global warming.
Earth
Scientists Examine a Hot Epoch to Forecast Climate Future
Apr 13, 2012 15:37 PM E
To figure out what is likely to happen to Earth's climate this century, scientists are looking 3 million years into the past.
Lecture
Tennessee Teacher Law Could Boost Creationism, Climate Denial
Apr 13, 2012 12:06 PM E
A new Tennessee law protects teachers who explore the "scientific strengths and scientific weaknesses" of evolution and climate change, a move science education advocates say could make it easier for creationism and global warming denial to enter U.S. classrooms.
BP
Gulf Coast Residents Say BP Oil Spill Changed Their Environmental Views, UNH Research Finds
Apr 12, 2012 10:58 AM E
University of New Hampshire researchers have found that residents of Louisiana and Florida most acutely and directly affected by the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster -- the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history -- said they have changed their views on other environmental issues as a result of the spill.
The Studied Ecosystems with Increasing Elevation from Left to Right
Climate Change Boosts Then Quickly Stunts Plants, Decade-long Study Shows
Apr 11, 2012 13:58 PM E
Global warming may initially make the grass greener, but not for long, according to new research results. The findings, published this week in the journal Nature Climate Change, show that plants may thrive in the early stages of a warming environment but then begin to deteriorate quickly.
Growing Nitrous Oxide Levels Explained
Apr 11, 2012 09:34 AM E
Australian, Korean and US scientists have generated a 65-year record of Southern Hemisphere nitrous oxide measurements establishing a new benchmark against which to compare changes in the long-lived greenhouse gas that is also a major ozone-depleting substance.Published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience, the record is drawn from atmospheri...
Raised-Field Farming
800-year-old Farmers Could Teach us How to Protect the Amazon
Apr 10, 2012 11:23 AM E
In the face of mass deforestation of the Amazon, recent findings indicate that we could learn from its earliest inhabitants who managed their farmland sustainably. An international team of archaeologists and paleoecologists, including Dr. Mitchell Power, curator of the Garrett Herbarium at the Natural History Museum of Utah and assistant professor ...
Antarctic ice
Confirming Carbon's Climate Effects
Apr 07, 2012 11:10 AM E
Harvard scientists are helping to paint the fullest picture yet of how a handful of factors, particularly world-wide increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide, combined to end the last ice age approximately 20,000 to 10,000 years ago.
Permafrost in Alaska
Thawing Permafrost 50 Million Years Ago Led to Global Warming Events
Apr 05, 2012 09:26 AM E
In a new study reported in Nature, climate scientist Rob DeConto of the University of Massachusetts Amherst and colleagues elsewhere propose a simple new mechanism to explain the source of carbon that fed a series of extreme warming events about 55 million years ago, the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), and a sequence of similar, smaller warming events afterward.
Julie Brigham-Grette, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
NRC Authors Brief Federal Agencies on the State of Polar Regions
Apr 04, 2012 13:44 PM E
The U.S. National Research Council this week released a synthesis of reports from thousands of scientists in 60 countries who took part in the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-08, the first in over 50 years to offer a benchmark for environmental conditions and new discoveries in the polar regions.
Coastline of Louisiana
Scientists Find Slow Subsidence of Earth's Crust Beneath the Mississippi Delta
Apr 02, 2012 13:14 PM E
The Earth's crust beneath the Mississippi Delta sinks at a much slower rate than what had been assumed.
Coral
Corals 'Could Survive a More Acidic Ocean'
Apr 02, 2012 10:19 AM E
Corals may be better placed to cope with the gradual acidification of the world's oceans than previously thought - giving rise to hopes that coral reefs might escape climatic devastation.
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